Colorado Divorce FAQs (Pt. 1)

While making the choice to dissolve your marriage is a big decision, knowing what to expect and how to plan for an impending divorce can help the process go as smoothly (and, ideally, as peacefully) as possible.

Check out these Colorado divorce FAQs for some answers to commonly asked questions. Or just call Goldman Law, LLC for answers to all of your questions.

Check out these Colorado divorce FAQs for some answers to commonly asked questions. Or just call Goldman Law, LLC for answers to all of your questions.

In this three-part blog, we will answer some of the most common questions people have when they are thinking about filing for divorce in Colorado. If you have questions about divorce or are ready to initiate your divorce, don’t hesitate to contact the trusted and experienced Denver divorce attorneys at Goldman Law, LLC.

Q: What are legal grounds for divorce in Colorado?

A: The only ground for getting a divorce in Colorado is irretrievable breakdown of a marriage. In other words, a married couple filing for divorce under this ground is effectively claiming that the spouses in the marriage are no longer able to get along with each other and that reconciliation is impossible.

The reason that irretrievable breakdown of a marriage is the only ground for divorce in Colorado is that Colorado is a “no-fault” divorce state. Therefore, factors like a spouse’s alleged infidelities or other misconduct within the marriage won’t play a role in determining:

  • Whether the divorce is granted
  • Whether a spouse is awarded alimony (or spousal support)
  • The division of the marital property.

Q: Does Colorado have a residency requirement for filing for divorce?

A: Yes. Before filing for divorce in Colorado, at least one of the spouses in the marriage has to have resided in the state of Colorado for a minimum of 90 days.

Q: What is considered to be “marital property”?

A: In general, marital property refers to any property acquired during the course of marriage (but prior to the official separation of the couple). In the most amicable divorces, divorcing partners will be able to agree on how the marital property should be divided, and the courts will not get involved in this aspect of the divorce.

This, however, is not always the case, as the division of marital property tends to be one of the more highly contentious aspects of many divorce proceedings. Because various factors (like, for instance, each spouse’s contributions to the marriage and the marital assets) will play a role in determining the division of marital property during the divorce, it’s best to consult an attorney for more specific answers regarding what you can expect from this aspect of the divorce.

For more answers to common questions that arise when spouses are considering filing for divorce in Colorado, be sure to check out the upcoming second and third parts of this blog.

Denver Divorce Lawyers at Goldman Law, LLC

If you are going through a divorce or dealing with any matter related to family law, the trusted Denver divorce attorneys at Goldman Law, LLC are ready to stand up for your rights and help you resolve your case as favorably as possible. At Goldman Law, LLC, we know how contentious and distressing divorce can be, and we also know how to fight for our clients’ in any legal setting.

Contact Us

To learn more about your rights and receive a professional case evaluation, contact us by calling (303) 656-9529 or by emailing us using the contact form on this page. From our offices in Denver, we serve clients throughout Colorado.

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